Teach your family member about sexuality and relationships

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Teach your family member about sexuality and relationships

Sexual issues should address the person’s biological age.

Sexuality Education Overview by Dr. Peter Gerhardt

Dr. Peter Gerhardt gives a comprehensive and lively overview of the issues people with autism face regarding sexuality. Dr. Gerhardt shares perspectives, recommendations and helpful resources to educate people on the challenges faced by the autism community and how to help individuals learn about their sexuality.

Autism Research Institute - Sexuality and Autism

Like it or not, if you have a child, sexuality and sexual issues are things you're going to deal with eventually, either directly (and positively), or indirectly (and most likely negatively) from the imprints made on your child by other people or sources. If your child has autism, this blissful topic gets even more interesting, or uncomfortable, depending on your perspective. What you must remember is that sexual behavior in child development is normal and it can be tracked through the developmental stages of your child. You can either ignore it, pretend the issue doesn't exist, or you can do what the boy scouts always tell us: "Be Prepared!"

The Our Whole Lives Curriculum

Our Whole Lives helps participants make informed and responsible decisions about their sexual health and behavior. It equips participants with accurate, age-appropriate information in six subject areas: human development, relationships, personal skills, sexual behavior, sexual health, and society and culture. Grounded in a holistic view of sexuality, Our Whole Lives not only provides facts about anatomy and human development, but also helps participants clarify their values, build interpersonal skills, and understand the spiritual, emotional, and social aspects of sexuality.

The Sexuality Information and Education Council of the US (SIECUS)

SIECUS educates, advocates, and informs. They help schools and communities develop comprehensive sexuality education curricula, train teachers to provide high quality sexuality education in the classroom, and help parents talk to their kids about sex. They educate policymakers and their staff about issues related to sexuality and train advocates on the local, state, and national levels to build support for comprehensive sexuality education and access to reproductive health information and services. They produce countless resources for a wide variety of audiences—from policymakers to parents, healthcare providers to teens—to ensure that everyone has access to accurate, complete, and up-to-date information about sexuality.

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